Celler de Ronda: Wine, not dine

Xavi serving at Celler de Ronda, Barcelona

Weary of looking for authentic? (Definition: ‘of undisputed origin and not a copy; genuine’). Fear not the semantic satiation!

Celler de Ronda bucks the trend of patatas bravas for a fiver and tins of cold seafood (forks supplied!) for more. It embraces modern trends with a cordial wink to the great and authentic Spanish/Catalan off licences of old.

“We sell more vino granel (cheap wine from a barrel) than anything else,” explained owner Xavi.

“It’s less than two euros for a half litre and perfect table wine.”

Port, cooking, sweet wine and more at Celler de Ronda, Barcelona

Propping it up

Xavi and his partner Dilcia have become a pillar of community during the establishment’s six-year existence.

Castellers – the Catalan tradition of human tower building – takes up Xavi’s spare time. He acts as a pillar (pinya) at the bottom of Castellers for Jove de Barcelona, supporting those that wobble. Insert something clever about wine and wobbles here.

Occasionally the family pet, Laya, will yap hi; she usually stays on her blanket at the back of the shop and bark at you once (tail wagging).

Laya, protector, Celler de Ronda, Barcelona

Getting the right wine

It’s Xavi’s palate and search for new tastes that marks the Celler out. Xavi tries every single wine that he sells, having learned his trade at El Celler de la Boqueria.

Weekends see more sales of bottles. “I know every wine and so if you tell me what you are looking for, I can make suggestions,” says Xavi.

“Some people just say they like wine, some people really want to know about the grapes, others want to know which red wine could go well with fish.

Owner's recommendation, Celler de Ronda, Barcelona

“We look for the small producers and not the mass suppliers. We may not have lots of one type of wine, but we have a few cases of a lot of different types, something for everyone.” His favourite tipple at the moment is from the Mas Rodó vineyards.

We often shop at Mercado San Antoni on Saturday mornings then head to the Celler de Ronda and have a bottle matched to our food for us.

Xavi continued: “I prefer to call this a Tienda de Vino (wine shop), rather than your classic bodega. It’s not about selling the most expensive bottle, or offering vermut or snacks, but about getting the right wine to the right person.”

Wine growing regions

Celler de Ronda covers Spain’s main wine regions: Cataluña, Rioja, Penedes Ribera del Duero and more. Priorat is my favourite.

Various wines to choose from, Celler de Ronda, Barcelona

There are also artisanal beers, IPA, brandy, licor de café – careful with this mix of strong alcohol and coffee – and more. My Christmas cake is soaked in brandy from Celler de Ronda.

Cava is a staple of Catalan life and don’t be surprised to be saying ‘chin chin’ with a glass at any hour; breakfast, lunch, dinner, all good. Celler de Ronda has its own eponymous Cava, a Brut Nature Joven (young); “Mas fresco,” explains Xavi.

More my style are the ciders – the Basque is more acidic than the sweeter Asturian drop – yet they lack the punch of some of the chewy West Country squeal of Gloucestershire.

Hair of the dog

Famous Vichy Catalan sparking water is the second best seller, and at €1.10 a bottle with 15 cents on return of the bottle, it’s easy to see why.

My partner, the Plek, is a fan of Vichy for the-day-after-the-night-before. Plek said: “Bodegas used to sell drinks like Vichy, so he’s keeping the traditions going.

“It’s environmentally friendly, cheap – and the bubbles are good for you.”

Wine bottle corks, Celler de Ronda, Barcelona

Drop in for a drop 

Xavi speaks some English and can help visitors find a fine wine, and mainly trades with locals.

“My dad used to bring wine home to drink and many years ago I would just be like most people, drinking wine and not knowing much about it. But at the Boqueria I learned and now I can tell just by looking at a wine, its colour its look, if I will like it, without even sniffing it.”

Opening hours

Mon-Sat: 0900-1430 / 1630-2100

Sunday: 11.30-14.30

Celler de Ronda, Ronda Sant Pau 77, Tel: 931 923 814

Instagram: Celler de Ronda

Vintage shop signs of Ronda de San Antoni, Barcelona

Els Tres Tombs 2, Ronda de San Antoni, Barcelona

Ronda de San Antoni may not be high on many people’s places to visit, but here at Four Blocks from….we love life’s vignettes.

Look up.

Ronda de San Antoni is one of Barcelona’s important arteries; it runs north to south for 700m, starting at the busy Plaça de la Universitat. The Ronda becomes pedestrianised about halfway along, a stretch of concrete that temporarily housed Mercado San Antoni in tents during the original market building’s refurbishment.

The space left behind is now a thoroughly pleasant place to stroll, with hopscotch and play areas for kids, jumpers for goalposts football pitches and the chance for residents to…

Look up.

Like much of ‘new’ Barcelona, construction started in the 1880s albeit most buildings here are from the 1920s and 1930s. Barcelona’s tight streets don’t always allow for its building fronts to be properly seen. With the temporary market gone, the Ronda opened up.

What piqued my attention immediately were what are now probably vintage shop signs.

Look up! Here are some of my favourites from the Ronda – there are many more in the barrio – and here they are in north to south spotting order.

 

Vintage shop signs

La Torre undergarments shop, Ronda de San Antoni, Barcelona
La Torre: It was being painted the day I walked by. Has some original signing of almost 100 years of age. ‘Timeless’ underwear, too.

 

Coffee Shop, Cafes Caracas, Ronda de San Antoni, Barcelona
Cafes Caracas: Two fonts, two colours. Cafes is clear – Caracas is a wonderfully illegible squiggle a doctor would be proud of.

 

Mistral Bakery, Ronda de San Antoni, Barcelona
Forn Mistral: I love the bulbous curves and the matchsticks lines, reflected in the canopy, too. Best ensaïmadas (sweet pastries) in Barcelona – just look at them!

 

Hostal Delfos, Ronda de San Antoni, Barcelona
Hostal Delfos: Hidden away and easy to miss, this sign is classically drab. Reviews suggest the rooms, shared toilets and hygiene standards can all be inferred from this yellowed wonder sign.

 

Motor School, Ronda de San Antoni, Barcelona
Autoescola 2000: If you can’t be bothered to make an effort, show that you can’t.

 

Sports Ramells outdoor shop, Ronda de San Antoni, Barcelona
Sports Remmells: These were put up in 1969 and age better than fine wine. Half a century selling sports and outdoor kit, easy to see how they pull them in.

 

Sir, shoe shop, Ronda de San Antoni, Barcelona
Sir: My personal favourite. No need for words.

 

Luxpiel, Ronda de San Antoni, Barcelona
Luxpiel: The L, X and E are works of font mastery, and that yellow…I would go every week, if it were a nightclub.

 

Els Tres Tombs and apartments, Ronda de San Antoni, Barcelona
Els Tres Tombs: This sign needs the building behind it to frame it properly. A Barcelona classic and landmark which never seems to close. Best visited at 3am to see randoms, or 6-8am when the all-night party people’s special type of cheeriness mixes with folk on the way to work.

 

Seen a sign?

Barcelona is full of amazing shop signs – feel free to share your favourites.

Best butcher in Barcelona

Manel i Elisabet, San Antoni market

Welcome, dear reader,

This week, meat. 

When The Plek (my partner) and I first moved to the San Antoni barrio, Mercado San Antoni was housed in two enormous tents on Ronda de San Antoni. The food tent was above the Metro station, shoppers and stalls packed in like sardines. Outside the smallest store there was always a large queue of locals ordering a vast array of unusual cuts of meat from three souls slicing while confined to a 3 x 2m space.

We queued. We ordered. We paid. We went home. We cooked. We fell in love with each other (again). Aaah. And with Manel i Elisabet, the finest butchers in town.

From thereon in, we were delighted to join the throng – old folk, young folk, restaurant owners and anyone with a good eye for meat shops.

San Antoni Market from outside, Barcelona

Shopping is changing to a ticket system now, but many places in Spain still adhere to the rule of bowling up, asking ‘Who’s last?’ (El ultimo?) and finding your place in the queue. Albeit there are always a few ready to jump the line if you don’t make yourself known sharp.

The stall is housed in the magnificent, reformed Mercado de San Antoni; this iron structure built in 1882 is once again the centre of our neighbourhood.

 

Manel i Elisabet shop sign, San Antoni market, Barcelona

Manel i Elisabet is a third-generation butcher who first started serving the good citizens of San Antoni in the 1930s. Manel is of true butcher stock, learning at the knee of his grandfather and father after completing military service aged 19. Elisabet is from a line of poultry sellers whose shop was next to Manel’s – they met, and the rest is history. 

 

Locally-sourced produce

Selection of meats at Manel i Elisabet, San Antonio market, BarcelonaOnce married, they joined the two shops together and now sell a delicious range of beef, lamb, chicken, poultry and pork products. The majority comes from nearby Girona or Vila Franca de Penedes, and the rest from Catalonia. 

Elisabet said: “We know where everything comes from, which farmers, and we get fresh produce every day.

“We eat the produce we sell and the smell of proper, well-kept meat opens up the appetite and the stomach.”

 

Back in the day

Locals are fondest of the homemade burgers – prepared right in front of your eyes – along with chicken breasts. “I prefer to cut pork ribs,” said Elisabet. Manel prefers what the Argentinians call ‘la arañita’ cut, or pedaset in Catalan. It’s a small cut of meat, usually beef, near the thigh socket.

He explained: “Not many people ask for it, and it’s really tender when you fry it. Many years ago, it was only men that were butchers and they would do all the cutting early in the morning and then leave the women to work and serve for the rest of the day.

“The men would then go and fry up some pedaset and drink red wine. It’s changed now.”

Arguments (rightly) rage about the quantity of meat in the modern diet, the industrialisation of production and its effect on animal welfare, but Manel i Elisabet know their farmers. What hasn’t changed is people’s desire for good food. 

 

Locally-sourced shoppers

Elisabet said: “We have a lot of loyal, local customers. We see a few new faces. We see a lot of parents stocking up the freezers for their kids, those that have come to Barcelona to study and want to make sure they are eating well.

“People know we know where our stock comes from, that we have good quality at good prices, and hopefully that’s why we’re busy.”

Now you know – Fridays and Saturdays are always buzzing, as are mornings. You can always order ahead and then just pick up and pay.

The Plek and I will no doubt be wandering around there next weekend, then off to the bodega to find a nice red to go with the pedaset.

 

Opening hours and contact

Manel i Elisabet, parades 1-2, Mercado San Antoni

Tel: +34 934 263 378

Mon, Tue, Sat: 8am-3pm

Weds-Fri: 8am-3pm / 5pm-8pm

Jardins de Cándida Pérez, Barcelona

Jardins del Cándida Pérez, Comte Borrell, Barcelona

Welcome, dear reader,

I’ve been living in the San Antoni barrio (neighbourhood) for three of the nine years I’ve called Barcelona home.

Along with my partner, known as hitherto as The Plek, we seldom need to walk more than four blocks from our front door to find almost everything we enjoy.

This blog is about what we love about our part of this city; the people, food, bars, shops, animals and whatever else we encounter.

There’s a lot of life to be seen from our 10m2 balcony that looks over the Jardins de Cándida Pérez – and that’s precisely where we start.

Jardins del Cándida Pérez, Comte Borrell, Barcelona

 

Gardens (Jardins) Cándida Pérez

The Plek and I reckon, Rear Window style, there are about 200 other flats that peer into this central courtyard along with Biblioteca de Sant Antoni-Joan Olivé.

Some trees and bushes line and dot what is essentially a kids’ playground and outdoor gym, with some benches and seats.

It’s named after the singer Cándida Pérez, a master of warbling ‘cuplés’ (variety songs) who lived in Brazil, but was born and bred (then dead) in Catalonia.

Fortunately there is no audio homage playing here.

Afternoon siestas are often accompanied by a lilt from our resident blackbird who also likes to toot at sundown, sometimes sat on our washing line. The tax we pay is the occasional dropping on what were freshly-washed towels.

There is also a whopping great chimney in the middle of the park, the remnants of the Tarda Dolcos (sweets) factory. Locals reliably inform me that Tarda produced boiled sweets, chocolates and turron and closed its doors some 40-50 years ago.

 

Wildlife of San Antoni

Our lead singer is not alone. Flop down into one of our balcony’s street seats – furniture left in the street by neighbours for others to use – and a fine supporting chorus appears.

Swifts’ distinctive chatter greets us every morning in the summer. These migratory birds fly in and out of the balcony like charged alien spacecraft. They launch from the nests they’ve built in walls and crevices around the Jardins.

At night, bats compete to snatch a mosquito meal. Such rapier flight is essential; Peregrine Falcons have been reintroduced and we’ve seen one scouting for a swift meal.

Pigeons roost here, too, always watchful of seagulls who think nothing of attack-and-kill tactics. There are often a set of wings on display on a roof, folded out like an angel but lacking any body.

There are also a dozen or so domestic cats that scour these plains, looking for a kill. They are, however, absolutely awful hunters and we’ve never seen a successful chase.

 

Human’s in El Barrio

The gardens are incredibly important to the community. They are a space to hold a birthday party or concert and somewhere to let the kids blast off steam, to name but a few social functions.

OK, some Sunday mornings the screaming at 10am is a bit much, but apparently these children are to be considered as newts – and newts are good.

“If you can see children, it’s probably a healthy and happy city.” says Liz Zeidler, chief executive of the Happy City Initiative, a research centre based in Bristol. Read more here.

There’s a boules/petanque group, teens who come to learn dance moves, people training and keeping fit plus a plethora of dog walkers and the occasional drunk. 

Candida would perhaps be proud of the karaoke parties, hear a rhythm in the pot-banging that has accompanied Catalonia’s political ups and downs of late, and, like us, want to shout at the folk who let their dogs bark at all hours.

Oh, and did I mention I saw some very impressive meteors burning up in the atmosphere one evening, just over the Med.

Hardly any neighbours use their balcony for meals, drinks and enjoying the breeze, so we get this almost all to ourselves.

Oh, and hats off to the guys who watch TV all day, every day, too. We know you won’t be reading.