Celler de Ronda: Wine, not dine

Xavi serving at Celler de Ronda, Barcelona

Weary of looking for authentic? (Definition: ‘of undisputed origin and not a copy; genuine’). Fear not the semantic satiation!

Celler de Ronda bucks the trend of patatas bravas for a fiver and tins of cold seafood (forks supplied!) for more. It embraces modern trends with a cordial wink to the great and authentic Spanish/Catalan off licences of old.

“We sell more vino granel (cheap wine from a barrel) than anything else,” explained owner Xavi.

“It’s less than two euros for a half litre and perfect table wine.”

Port, cooking, sweet wine and more at Celler de Ronda, Barcelona

Propping it up

Xavi and his partner Dilcia have become a pillar of community during the establishment’s six-year existence.

Castellers – the Catalan tradition of human tower building – takes up Xavi’s spare time. He acts as a pillar (pinya) at the bottom of Castellers for Jove de Barcelona, supporting those that wobble. Insert something clever about wine and wobbles here.

Occasionally the family pet, Laya, will yap hi; she usually stays on her blanket at the back of the shop and bark at you once (tail wagging).

Laya, protector, Celler de Ronda, Barcelona

Getting the right wine

It’s Xavi’s palate and search for new tastes that marks the Celler out. Xavi tries every single wine that he sells, having learned his trade at El Celler de la Boqueria.

Weekends see more sales of bottles. “I know every wine and so if you tell me what you are looking for, I can make suggestions,” says Xavi.

“Some people just say they like wine, some people really want to know about the grapes, others want to know which red wine could go well with fish.

Owner's recommendation, Celler de Ronda, Barcelona

“We look for the small producers and not the mass suppliers. We may not have lots of one type of wine, but we have a few cases of a lot of different types, something for everyone.” His favourite tipple at the moment is from the Mas Rodó vineyards.

We often shop at Mercado San Antoni on Saturday mornings then head to the Celler de Ronda and have a bottle matched to our food for us.

Xavi continued: “I prefer to call this a Tienda de Vino (wine shop), rather than your classic bodega. It’s not about selling the most expensive bottle, or offering vermut or snacks, but about getting the right wine to the right person.”

Wine growing regions

Celler de Ronda covers Spain’s main wine regions: Cataluña, Rioja, Penedes Ribera del Duero and more. Priorat is my favourite.

Various wines to choose from, Celler de Ronda, Barcelona

There are also artisanal beers, IPA, brandy, licor de café – careful with this mix of strong alcohol and coffee – and more. My Christmas cake is soaked in brandy from Celler de Ronda.

Cava is a staple of Catalan life and don’t be surprised to be saying ‘chin chin’ with a glass at any hour; breakfast, lunch, dinner, all good. Celler de Ronda has its own eponymous Cava, a Brut Nature Joven (young); “Mas fresco,” explains Xavi.

More my style are the ciders – the Basque is more acidic than the sweeter Asturian drop – yet they lack the punch of some of the chewy West Country squeal of Gloucestershire.

Hair of the dog

Famous Vichy Catalan sparking water is the second best seller, and at €1.10 a bottle with 15 cents on return of the bottle, it’s easy to see why.

My partner, the Plek, is a fan of Vichy for the-day-after-the-night-before. Plek said: “Bodegas used to sell drinks like Vichy, so he’s keeping the traditions going.

“It’s environmentally friendly, cheap – and the bubbles are good for you.”

Wine bottle corks, Celler de Ronda, Barcelona

Drop in for a drop 

Xavi speaks some English and can help visitors find a fine wine, and mainly trades with locals.

“My dad used to bring wine home to drink and many years ago I would just be like most people, drinking wine and not knowing much about it. But at the Boqueria I learned and now I can tell just by looking at a wine, its colour its look, if I will like it, without even sniffing it.”

Opening hours

Mon-Sat: 0900-1430 / 1630-2100

Sunday: 11.30-14.30

Celler de Ronda, Ronda Sant Pau 77, Tel: 931 923 814

Instagram: Celler de Ronda

Best butcher in Barcelona

Manel i Elisabet, San Antoni market

Welcome, dear reader,

This week, meat. 

When The Plek (my partner) and I first moved to the San Antoni barrio, Mercado San Antoni was housed in two enormous tents on Ronda de San Antoni. The food tent was above the Metro station, shoppers and stalls packed in like sardines. Outside the smallest store there was always a large queue of locals ordering a vast array of unusual cuts of meat from three souls slicing while confined to a 3 x 2m space.

We queued. We ordered. We paid. We went home. We cooked. We fell in love with each other (again). Aaah. And with Manel i Elisabet, the finest butchers in town.

From thereon in, we were delighted to join the throng – old folk, young folk, restaurant owners and anyone with a good eye for meat shops.

San Antoni Market from outside, Barcelona

Shopping is changing to a ticket system now, but many places in Spain still adhere to the rule of bowling up, asking ‘Who’s last?’ (El ultimo?) and finding your place in the queue. Albeit there are always a few ready to jump the line if you don’t make yourself known sharp.

The stall is housed in the magnificent, reformed Mercado de San Antoni; this iron structure built in 1882 is once again the centre of our neighbourhood.

 

Manel i Elisabet shop sign, San Antoni market, Barcelona

Manel i Elisabet is a third-generation butcher who first started serving the good citizens of San Antoni in the 1930s. Manel is of true butcher stock, learning at the knee of his grandfather and father after completing military service aged 19. Elisabet is from a line of poultry sellers whose shop was next to Manel’s – they met, and the rest is history. 

 

Locally-sourced produce

Selection of meats at Manel i Elisabet, San Antonio market, BarcelonaOnce married, they joined the two shops together and now sell a delicious range of beef, lamb, chicken, poultry and pork products. The majority comes from nearby Girona or Vila Franca de Penedes, and the rest from Catalonia. 

Elisabet said: “We know where everything comes from, which farmers, and we get fresh produce every day.

“We eat the produce we sell and the smell of proper, well-kept meat opens up the appetite and the stomach.”

 

Back in the day

Locals are fondest of the homemade burgers – prepared right in front of your eyes – along with chicken breasts. “I prefer to cut pork ribs,” said Elisabet. Manel prefers what the Argentinians call ‘la arañita’ cut, or pedaset in Catalan. It’s a small cut of meat, usually beef, near the thigh socket.

He explained: “Not many people ask for it, and it’s really tender when you fry it. Many years ago, it was only men that were butchers and they would do all the cutting early in the morning and then leave the women to work and serve for the rest of the day.

“The men would then go and fry up some pedaset and drink red wine. It’s changed now.”

Arguments (rightly) rage about the quantity of meat in the modern diet, the industrialisation of production and its effect on animal welfare, but Manel i Elisabet know their farmers. What hasn’t changed is people’s desire for good food. 

 

Locally-sourced shoppers

Elisabet said: “We have a lot of loyal, local customers. We see a few new faces. We see a lot of parents stocking up the freezers for their kids, those that have come to Barcelona to study and want to make sure they are eating well.

“People know we know where our stock comes from, that we have good quality at good prices, and hopefully that’s why we’re busy.”

Now you know – Fridays and Saturdays are always buzzing, as are mornings. You can always order ahead and then just pick up and pay.

The Plek and I will no doubt be wandering around there next weekend, then off to the bodega to find a nice red to go with the pedaset.

 

Opening hours and contact

Manel i Elisabet, parades 1-2, Mercado San Antoni

Tel: +34 934 263 378

Mon, Tue, Sat: 8am-3pm

Weds-Fri: 8am-3pm / 5pm-8pm